Rachel C. P. Atkinson

Data, Design, Visualization & Mapping

Urban growth in Guangdong Province

NOTE: This is the product of a lab assignment from a course at UNC Chapel Hill (PLAN 591: Advanced GIS for Planners).
I can't take credit for the premise, and many of the steps were guided, so I offer this purely as an example of my competence with GIS and experience working with a broad range of ArcGIS functions.

I used Landsat imagery to identify land cover types in Guangdong Province for the years 1994 and 2000. This map illustrates the rapid growth in the province by showing the change in urban land cover between those years. All of the extensive areas of red were urbanized during a six year time period.

Silver Spring Density Gap

NOTE: This is the product of a lab assignment from a course at UNC Chapel Hill (PLAN 591: Advanced GIS for Planners). 
I can't take credit for the premise, and many of the steps were guided, so I offer this purely as an example of my competence with GIS and experience working with a broad range of ArcGIS functions.

This map illustrates the potential for infill development in Silver Spring, Maryland. A density gap is the difference between existing density and the maximum allowable density by zoning. In this map, density is measured by residential units per acre. 

The density gaps have been visualized by color and height. The polygons representing  properties with residential dwellings have been extruded by their density gaps. Properties with a significant density gap are extruded the most and symbolized red. Properties with no density gap are not extruded and are symbolized blue. All other density gaps fall between those extremes.

Community Connector Bus Route

NOTE: This is the product of a lab assignment from a course at UNC Chapel Hill (PLAN 591: Advanced GIS for Planners). 
I can't take credit for the premise, and many of the steps were guided, so I offer this purely as an example of my competence with GIS and experience working with a broad range of ArcGIS functions.

This hypothetical bus route links community centers and parks in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro metro area. To create this route, I used network analysis tools in ArcGIS. The data inputs included shapefiles of streets, parks, and community centers in the area.

I created a network from the street shapefile, and used the community centers as potential stops. I also created stops for parks by hand, choosing the nearest and best street connection to the park. I then created ¼ mile and ½ mile service areas around the stops to illustrate the ridership base. To ensure that the route took pedestrian safety into consideration, I created barriers at intersections along Hwy 54, so that areas opposite the major highway would not be considered part of the service area.


I created a route using Network Analyst, and ordered the stops to create the optimal route, starting and stopping at Chapel Hill Town Hall. I made sure the route avoided the Columbia/Franklin St intersection to minimize traffic impact.

 

New River Watershed Analysis

NOTE: This is the product of a lab assignment from a course at UNC Chapel Hill (PLAN 591: Advanced GIS for Planners). 
I can't take credit for the premise, and many of the steps were guided, so I offer this purely as an example of my competence with GIS and experience working with a broad range of ArcGIS functions.

This map of Onslow County shows sub-basins of the New River and their count of hog lagoons. It also shows two Shellfish Growing Areas, Shellfish Harvest Sites, and their upstream drainage areas. The steps of my analysis were as follows:

  1. Fill sinks in a Digital Elevation Model of Onslow County
  2. Determine direction of flow
  3. Determine flow accumulation
  4. Create stream network using Raster Calculator
  5. Use Basin tool to identify sub-basins (excluding those smaller than 5 acres)
  6. Join a layer with hog lagoon locations to the basins
  7. Symbolize basins with graduated colors by count of hog lagoons
  8. Locate shellfish growing areas
  9. Determine upstream drainage for shellfish growing areas using Snap Pour Point

The analysis showed that the upstream drainage for both Shellfish Harvest Sites flows from a sub-basin with zero hog lagoons. These shellfish harvest sites are therefore very unlikely to be contaminated by hog waste, and should be safe for consumption. 


Edgemont Neighborhood Assessment

I produced these maps for a neighborhood assessment of Edgemont – a historic neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina. The assessment was conducted for a neighborhood revitalization course at UNC Chapel Hill's Department of City and Regional Planning. 

Though I worked with a partner on the overall project, these maps are the result of my independent data collection, GIS work, and styling. All maps were created in ArcMap. The data comes from the City of Durham/County of Durham Geographic Information Systems Digital Data Portal, the US Census Bureau, and the Durham Police Department Crime Mapper.

The results of a complete asset inventory for the Edgemont neighborhood based on site visit observations.

© Rachel Carly Perlman Atkinson